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Business continuity

What would happen to your business if you were affected by a fire, flood, storms, theft, fraud or vandalism?

In 1996 the Manchester bombing affected over 600 businesses. Within six months 250 of these had gone out of business. Many of those that survived had a business continuity plan.

Businesses affected by a disaster that do not have a plan in place only have a 50 per cent chance of surviving the next 12 months.

Developing your own business continuity plan could help you to be one of those companies that survive.

Depending on the size and nature of your business will depend on how comprehensive your plan needs to be. By following the links below you can self assess your business to see how prepared you already are, and find out more information on whether you need to take further action.

How prepared are you? is a leaflet explaining the principles of business continuity management.

Business Continuity Management (BCM) is about identifying those parts of your business that you can’t afford to lose - such as information, stock, premises, staff - and planning how to maintain these, if an incident occurs.

Any incident, large or small, whether it is natural, accidental or deliberate, can cause major disruption to your organisation.  But if you plan now, rather than waiting for it to happen, you will be able to get back to business in the quickest possible time.  Delays could mean you lose valuable business to your competitors, or that your customers lose confidence in you.

Your BCM arrangements should include planning for:

  • loss of staff
  • loss of systems (IT and communications)
  • loss of utilities (water, gas, electricity)
  • loss of (or access to) premises
  • loss of key suppliers
  • disruption to transport
  • crime.


BCM

The Cabinet Office has further guidance on business continuity and gives the latest news on any issues affecting the UK.

Find out how you can protect your business against crimes and increase your security from Derbyshire Constabulary.

Derbyshire Fire & Rescue Service has fire safety guides for businesses and information on how you can carry out a fire risk assessment.

The Cabinet Office has published material on pandemic influenza for businesses and other organisations as a basis of advice to staff and to help plan for a pandemic.

The Business Continuity Institute provides general advice on business continuity.

Last updated: 16 Aug 2018, 10:16 a.m.